Tuesday, 7 May 2013

A Day in Parliament


One thing that has somewhat surprised us over recent months is the amount of politics and organisational challenges that rise up as our customers try to get Restricted Intelligence rolled our across their business.  For some, it’s just a few meetings and feather smoothing as the respective departments get on board. For others it’s a political minefield that connects new and old school thinking, and the usual office politics of who owns what and where.

It’s obviously not quite enough that our brave CISO’s are showing a progressive attitude by signing up for the campaign materials, that they are using entertainment to grab the attention of employees in their firm.  Up until now they’d only moaned about 90 day password resets and having to encrypt email attachments. Now our customers are the cool kids, sharing viral videos and making things fun.  I think our guys deserve a break, don’t you?

Here are three tips for getting the company (upstairs, communications, HR etc) on board:

1.          Make sure they can see what you’re intending to do. Share the links we have, and the documents on our downloads page. They are there to help you describe the package and the theory around why it works.

2.          Ask communications and HR for their help in adapting the source materials in the package.  They (HR, Comms etc) control the channels to our employee fan base (yes- I said fans…get used to it ;-). Asking them for branding and planning help makes them feel superior, and…er…you need the help, right?

3.          Engage with the soon-to-be released community of Restricted Intelligence users who have all had the same challenges you have. We’ll post details soon about the linked-in group and the upcoming webinars.

Finally – you can always ask us to help. I am always happy to jump on a call with your people to help them see how this can work in your firm.  I promise to play nice and never use bad language.  I also speak their language.  Also – I’ll be creating a helpful pdf you can have to translate the campaign benefits into comms-speak.  Answering common questions about branding, formats and languages etc etc.

And of course, reminding them that they too can bask in the reflected glory of a successful campaign.  Watch this space…

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